• Since when do you experience this problem?

  • You have to remove the last backslash. This works:

    $p = "C:PROGRAM FILES (X86)ADOBEACROBAT READER DC"
    tree $p
  • Yeah I saw that. But where are you using the environment variable for the programs folder? Can you describe what exactly your problem is? You can't assume that everyone knows how Adobe stores its data in the Registry.

  • I am sorry, I can't follow. Which code does not work?

  • Yeah strange. Seems to be a bug. Why don't use $p =${env:ProgramFiles(x86)} ?

  • Did you check if C:Program Files(x86) actually exist on the machine? If it does, this works:

    $p = "$env:ProgramFiles(x86)"
    tree $p
  • Seems this machine previously was an AD domain member. Do you have administrator rights on this computer?

  • If you post in the wrong forum, just let me know. I can move the topic.

    I am unsure what you are trying to accomplish, but did you try this:

    $p=$env:ProgramFiles
    tree $p
  • Michael Pietroforte posted a new activity comment 6 days, 21 hours ago

    Yeah, one of the best "features" of macOS is that you don't have to deal with the Registry mess of Windows. Imagine, I am using the same Mac for 5 years and it boots up and performs just like on the first day. If this was a Windows machine, I probably would have reinstalled Windows several times just to get normal speed back again. Getting rid of rogue apps (which rarely happens on a Mac if the manufacturer is not Microsoft) is super easy. Because there is no Registry, you simply have to delete all files. This is a system administrator's heaven!

  • Michael Pietroforte posted a new activity comment 1 week ago

    I can absolutely confirm this. When I dumped Windows a few years ago my productivity skyrocketed. Until today it is such a joy to work on a Mac. Having been a Windows lover for many years, I know that this is hard to understand for people who don't know the difference. You really have to try it for some time until you get used to the different UI philosophy. Most important is that the applications available for macOS are so much better than their Windows counterparts. Thus, the main reason why you want to move to macOS are the available third-party applications. The higher price for Macs is absolutely negligible because the much better productivity will save your company a lot of money. This is exactly what the PC inventor IBM discovered.

    • I had to adopt Mac to help users who ran into trouble due to incompatible apps! Loved the UNIX behind – getting rid of stubborn applications was piece of a cake. No registry keys to worry about. Found the the directory structure is “script friendly”. For example, “C:\Program Files (x86)” in Windows could not find a proper way to access it in a PowerShell script!

      • Yeah, one of the best “features” of macOS is that you don’t have to deal with the Registry mess of Windows. Imagine, I am using the same Mac for 5 years and it boots up and performs just like on the first day. If this was a Windows machine, I probably would have reinstalled Windows several times just to get normal speed back again. Getting rid of rogue apps (which rarely happens on a Mac if the manufacturer is not Microsoft) is super easy. Because there is no Registry, you simply have to delete all files. This is a system administrator’s heaven!

  • Paul, thanks! It appears PowerShell Remoting was build for typical on-premises LANs. Outside this environment PowerShell Remoting performs poorly.

    Take implicit remoting as an example. Before, I always used PowerShell to manage Office 365. However, because I am often on another continent than Microsoft's servers, it often takes ages until all the stuff is downloaded. So I now use the web interface whenever it offers the feature I need because I am usually much faster with it.

    On the other hand, when I manage Linux boxes I really don't have to care where they are located and in what environments they are running. SSH is fast, reliable, secure, and super simple to set up. In a way, this also summarizes the difference between Windows and Linux.

  • I think Leos is right, it is not clear what you want to do.

    If the internal site is in a private network,  you have configure your router to forward inbound traffic on the ports 80 and 443 to your private IP. Your DNS for ‘http://www.myoffice.com’  points to the router IP.

  • If it is a new site, it takes a while until Google will visit it again. You can register the site in the Google Search Console and configure a sitemap or add new pages manually (Discover), but I am not sure if this speeds up things.

  • I never tried it but I somehow doubt that this can work (reliably). PowerShell Core needs to be cross platform compatible. Every terminal has its own fonts and in some terminals you can't change the font size programmatically.  If you are on Windows, I suppose the font size is stored in the Registry and you could use PowerShell to change the settings.

  • Good catch! That was my bad. I corrected this now. Thanks!

  • Michael Pietroforte liked comment of Mike Kanakos on Managing PowerShell scheduled jobs. (So far, Mike Kanakos has 1 likes for this comment.) 2 weeks, 5 days ago

  • The date is at the top of the article below the title. I am afraid, BYOD is more relevant than ever.

  • I now changed back to two sidebars.

  • No, it is not just a long string. You can use object properties to parse the result. I gave a few examples in the article.

  • As you can see, the variable doesn't contain just a string, but a WebResponseObject. This means you can use this object to extract all the data you need.

  • Load More