• Are you using the Enterprise version of Windows 10?

    +1
  • Hmmm, strange. Are all the permissions right on the folders and the shares? Sorry I can't test very thoroughly for you at the moment, I am away at an event currently.

    +1
  • Hi Martin

    That doesn't happen when I test on Windows 10  "File not found" sounds odd. Can you actually browse to the path where it creates the file (C:windowsRemotePackagesxxxx) and see if that folder structure exists on the Windows 10 endpoints?

    +1
  • Schools can use whatever they want, assuming they have the right license in place. Enterprise doesn't mean LTSB either, it can be CB or CBB also.

    If you remove all of the Modern Apps within the image using PowerShell they shouldn't return if you've turned off Store updates via GPO.

    +1
  • Yes, and I think Microsoft are being naive about this. Here is an in-depth discussion of the issues around CBB versus LTSB, if you're willing to listen https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wZmtNrvU3Hs&t=147s

    +1
  • Standard roaming profiles (without redirection) only put load on the file server at logon and logoff as the profile is copied up there. However it is uncommon to see roaming profiles in use without folder redirection which imposes a load of its own during the session. The User Profile Disk maintains a single open file during the session which is read and written to, so in theory it should not create a significant increase in load (dependent on the number of users that are connected).

    +1
  • User Profile Disks (UPD) is a Microsoft technology best known for its use on Windows RDSH (Remote Desktop Session Host) Servers. It provides a lightweight method for user setting persistence. It works by mounting the user's profile area (%USERPROFILE%) to a .VHDX (Hyper-V virtual hard disk) file on a network share and essentially redirecting all profile write actions to this mounted disk.

    +1
  • When upgrading to Windows 10 it is crucial to preserve user's pertinent settings in applications, data, and user profiles. A variety of tools exist that help admins with this task.

    +1
  • Windows 10 brings a new set of challenges for deployment and management. Universal Windows Apps, Start menu and interface changes, user accounts and synchronization – these are a few of the areas where a […]

    +1
  • Windows 10 was free, though, and unless you’re breathtakingly naïve, there was always the expectation that Microsoft would shoehorn a tried-and-tested form of monetization into the platform. It has certainly do […]

    +1
  • Edge, being a browser (and what’s more, a new, standards-compliant, lightweight browser), is of specific interest to users, admins, and developers alike. However, users also have expectations of the behavior of t […]

    +1
  • One of the most notable features of Windows 10 (and possibly also Windows Server 2016) is the proliferation of what Microsoft calls Modern or Universal Apps. Essentially, the applications in these operating […]

    0
  • Hi Aaron

    I forgot about the imminent(ish) release of Server 2016, as I am running 2012 R2 in my lab, but it's a good point.

    Yes, the limitations of this recommendation are that it would apply by default to all users, unless you did something cunning with the permissions (and obviously that would require testing). At the moment, though, Windows 10 Anniversary build will be a .v6 profile and Server 2016 still uses a .v5, so initially you might be able to maintain two different streams, but obviously you'd be at the mercy of Microsoft incrementing the profile version for Server 2016 at any given time.

    Putting them in a reference image would be the most foolproof way, yes. I may do some research into ways of applying the default domain profile from the netlogon share for specific groups of users only, but at the moment nothing concrete jumps easily to mind.

    Cheers,

     

    JR

    0
  • Windows 7 completed a first logon in less than 35 seconds, and the profile weighed in at less than 5 MB. Windows 8.1 exponentially increased both the first logon time and the size of the profile. Windows 10 […]

    0
  • No, a fresh new user, profile and client build. The issues with non-roaming of Metro and Start Tiles are by design, as far as I can tell (although I may have found a way around the Start Tiles, which I will put out as a blog as soon as I can finish testing).

    As you've mentioned the latest build seems to address the Cortana crashing issues. The issue with profile unloads is recognized as a bug but as yet does not seem to be fixed. Issues with mandatory profiles and the like are still on the waiting list. Interestingly, 14279 also seems to fix an issue I noticed with "Export-StartLayout" being unable to run as a GP Logoff Script (it fails with a "class not registered" error). This is the key to being able to roam the Start Tiles, although you still have to "fudge" the technique somewhat.

    Unfortunately release for RS1 is not until June, which is disappointing for those (like me!) trying to deploy Windows 10 as it currently stands.

    Cheers,

     

    JR

    0
  • Interesting, I've been testing on 14279 and can concur that I haven't seen any Cortana crashes, but the other issues mentioned seem to still exist.

     

    Cheers,

     

    JR

    0
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    0
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