• In my last post, I discussed the preparations and process of migrating to OneDrive with Known Folder Move (KFM). Today, I’ll walk you through the corresponding Group Policy settings.

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  • Known Folder Move (KFM) is a set of Group Policy Objects (GPO) settings that attempt to migrate user data into the OneDrive Sync Client with a minimum of user and/or administrator intervention. Data are moved automatically into the user’s OneDrive storage, allowing the user to then access this data from any device that either has the OneDrive application installed or can access the OneDrive web client. This post outlines the preparations for KFM, and the next post covers the Group Policy settings for the OneDrive Sync Client.

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  • James Rankin changed their profile picture 1 month, 1 week ago

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  • In Remote Desktop Session Host (RDSH) environments, such as Citrix, VMware Horizon, Parallels, or Windows Virtual Desktop, adopting OneDrive can often bring a unique set of challenges. Microsoft now recommends the use of their FSLogix solution to help address these challenges by providing a "local" cache essentially mounted to a remote container.

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  • FSLogix would definitely help you get around this issue, but obviously it has a dollar value attached to it 🙂 Feel free to hit me up if you want more info

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  • Microsoft deprecated the "TileDataLayer" model in the Windows 10 1703 Creators Update. In this post, I describe a hack that allows you to work with Start Tiles in roaming user profiles.

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  • A Group Policy Object (GPO) has always allowed administrators to exclude folders from a roaming profile but not include them. I'd always assumed that the functionality of a roaming profile was more or less hardcoded, whereby it only captured data from AppDataRoaming. However, I have to admit I was mistaken, and I give big thanks to Raphael Schulz for pointing this out to me.

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  • When you see the temp profile, is there a file lock for the VHD file showing on the file server?

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  • It sounds like the server with the file share might not be fully patched. We had that issue very early on in testing but a patch remedied it.

    Are you using a Windows file server and is it fully patched? If not, it might be worth doing the patching or testing a Windows SMB file share for this...

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  • Thanks Per, that's saved me a job! 🙂 I will write an updated article in future and credit you for the findings.

    Thanks,

    JR

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  • Sorry, I can't seem to recreate the error you are having. UPD is supported in this way when using it for VDI, so you may be able to get Microsoft support to help.

    This does, however, bear out my point at the end of the article that UPD is a temperamental product. If you're looking to deploy this in a production environment, FSLogix Profile Containers may well be worth looking into.

    Thanks,

    JR

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  • I was going to do a follow-up article around this...

    On Server 2012 R2, if you enable this, there are options for the UPD that allow you to exclude folders. I'm assuming these translate to Registry keys. So if you exclude certain folders on the Server UPD and then search the Registry for these folders you should find the exclusion keys.

    Apologies if this is a bit fiddly - hopefully I might be able to track them down and do a follow-up article by the end of the week or so.

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  • Ah that may be the issue then. All my testing is done on Enterprise. The Pro edition is somewhat hobbled so may not have this available as a feature, per se.

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  • Are you using the Enterprise version of Windows 10?

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  • Hmmm, strange. Are all the permissions right on the folders and the shares? Sorry I can't test very thoroughly for you at the moment, I am away at an event currently.

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  • Hi Martin

    That doesn't happen when I test on Windows 10  "File not found" sounds odd. Can you actually browse to the path where it creates the file (C:windowsRemotePackagesxxxx) and see if that folder structure exists on the Windows 10 endpoints?

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  • Schools can use whatever they want, assuming they have the right license in place. Enterprise doesn't mean LTSB either, it can be CB or CBB also.

    If you remove all of the Modern Apps within the image using PowerShell they shouldn't return if you've turned off Store updates via GPO.

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  • Yes, and I think Microsoft are being naive about this. Here is an in-depth discussion of the issues around CBB versus LTSB, if you're willing to listen https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wZmtNrvU3Hs&t=147s

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  • Standard roaming profiles (without redirection) only put load on the file server at logon and logoff as the profile is copied up there. However it is uncommon to see roaming profiles in use without folder redirection which imposes a load of its own during the session. The User Profile Disk maintains a single open file during the session which is read and written to, so in theory it should not create a significant increase in load (dependent on the number of users that are connected).

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  • User Profile Disks (UPD) is a Microsoft technology best known for its use on Windows RDSH (Remote Desktop Session Host) Servers. It provides a lightweight method for user setting persistence. It works by mounting the user's profile area (%USERPROFILE%) to a .VHDX (Hyper-V virtual hard disk) file on a network share and essentially redirecting all profile write actions to this mounted disk.

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