Microsoft has obviously shifted its strategy when it comes to web standards. Instead of leading the web community and setting its own industrial standards, the company is now trying to be the first to implement open standards. HTML5 is the best example.

For many admins, the question of whether to deploy the latest version of Internet Explorer or not never came up simply because they only deployed a new browser version with a new Windows version. Even though new IE versions were also available for older Windows versions, for many organizations the benefits of deploying a new browser did not justify the costs. Is the situation different with Internet Explorer 9? In this series, I will summarize the new features and other noteworthy things about Internet Explorer 9.
Internet-Explorer-9-Logo

Internet Explorer 9 Platform Preview or Internet Explorer 9 Beta ^

If you want to try Internet Explorer 9, you have two options: You can either install the Internet Explorer 9 Test Drive (Internet Explorer Platform Preview) or the beta release of Internet Explorer 9.

The downside of Internet Explorer 9 Beta is that it replaces Internet Explorer 8 on your computer. So far, IE9 appears to be stable to me, but running a beta on a productive system is always a risky.

The downside of the Platform Preview is that it has a different user interface that is not suitable for surfing the web. All you can do with the IE9 Test Drive is load particular pages to test whether they display properly, run performance tests, etc. IE9 Beta and IE9 Platform Preview have the same rendering engine.

HTML5 ^

Most interesting is the support of parts of HTML5, a new W3C standard that is still in the Draft Standard state. Thanks to HTML5, IE9 will now support video and audio playback without the need to install plugins such as Flash or Silverlight.

The new scripting APIs, with their support of features such as drag-and-drop, the canvas element (dynamic, scriptable rendering of 2D shapes and bitmap images), or cross-document messaging, will allow a new generation of web apps.

Other new web standards ^

Also noteworthy is the support of Web Open Font Format (WOFF) (a new font format that will make fonts interoperable across all browsers), CSS3 (now modularized), and Scalable Vector Graphics (SVG) (two-dimensional vector graphics).

Verdict ^

Microsoft has obviously shifted its strategy when it comes to web standards. Instead of leading the web community and setting its own industrial standards, the company is now trying to be the first to implement open standards.

Perhaps Microsoft is just tired of being attacked by open web activists, or perhaps the new open standards are technically better than they were at the first browser war. It could also be that Microsoft is now more relaxed because, after so many years, the web still has not replaced Windows even though new (more powerful) players are now trying where Netscape failed so pitifully many years ago.

The strategy shift comes at a high price. Supporting the new open standards means giving up the IE6 industrial standard, and this now prevents many organizations from upgrading to Windows 7. It also helped other browsers gain market shares because IE no longer has superior web capabilities to offer and the "best viewed with Internet Explorer badges" have long disappeared. The future will tell if this new strategy pays off for Microsoft, only for their competitor in Mountain View or perhaps for the whole web.

In my next post in this series, I will have a look at the new user interface of Internet Explorer 9.

0 Comments

Leave a reply

Your email address will not be published.

*

© 4sysops 2006 - 2022

CONTACT US

Please ask IT administration questions in the forums. Any other messages are welcome.

Sending

Log in with your credentials

or    

Forgot your details?

Create Account